Untitled

Reblogged from c-squiggle

(Source: fancyjoltik)

Reblogged from c-squiggle

(Source: vaguelydisinterested)

Reblogged from topsambottomdean

J2 + having fun together in Austin [x/x/x/x]

Reblog if you agree that Sam & Dean are the heart and soul of Supernatural and everything/everyone else is secondary.

Reblogged from topsambottomdean

(Source: j2aretherealsamanddean)

Reblogged from movin-like-a-scientist

(Source: d0nn0)

http://harrypotter-and-lordoftherings.tumblr.com/post/97564115452/so-i-had-a-dream-that-jensen-ackles-was-playing

Reblogged from harrypotter-and-lordoftherings

harrypotter-and-lordoftherings:

So I had a dream that Jensen Ackles was playing pro tennis for some reason but he really wasn’t that good and he was playing this goth dude and he couldnt even hit one of the balls that the dude was serving and it was really funny and he was making fun of himself the whole time and was saying that…

Reblogged from camiluna27

samandriel:

i was confused when i scrolled down and it didn’t say “old as balls”

referenceforwriters:


S E T T I N G (Image source)

The setting consists of these elements, which you ought to describe through the course of the story. It is up to you, however, to decide how necessary it is to do so and why.
Which element is more important right now? Why? The most common answer is because it plays an impact on the story, so you should give it a higher priority in that particular moment. Overall we should get a feeling however brief of each or most of them.
Why are settings important at all? Because the story is happening somewhere. Even if it’s happening in a void or in the middle of a nothingness, you could describe it. It helps making your story more memorable and your writing more vivid. 
How much should you describe? Again, there isn’t a rule. It is up to you. You’d not spend a page describing a room that plays no interesting or important part in the story, would you? If you do it, you’ll make the readers believe it is more important than it actually is, or bore them out. During the first draft you can spend as much as you want pointing out details of the environment and the space but know that during revision, they could and will get cut out if they’re not relevant whatsoever.
The relationship between world-building and the settings: they’re directly related. If you’re creating a new world you’ll have to work through a lot of describing, and that has to do with—you guessed it—the environment. The space, time and temperature. All of these have to do with the world you’re creating if they’re different from what we normally see or if they’re not.
Let’s say it, describing things is oftentimes quite fun and a great way to practice vocabulary and your use of metaphors and similes to show and not tell in a powerful way. 
The following links provide great advice on both settings and world building and I recommend checking them out.
Common Setting Failures
The Senses and World Building
Fantasy World Building Questions
Tips on Revealing Setting
The Rules of Quick and Dirty World Building
The Description Pyramid
Physical Descriptions Put Readers Into Place
Location, Location, Location
Creating Your Own World
Imagery
-Alex

Reblogged from writeworld

referenceforwriters:

S E T T I N G (Image source)

The setting consists of these elements, which you ought to describe through the course of the story. It is up to you, however, to decide how necessary it is to do so and why.

  • Which element is more important right now? Why? The most common answer is because it plays an impact on the story, so you should give it a higher priority in that particular moment. Overall we should get a feeling however brief of each or most of them.
  • Why are settings important at all? Because the story is happening somewhere. Even if it’s happening in a void or in the middle of a nothingness, you could describe it. It helps making your story more memorable and your writing more vivid. 
  • How much should you describe? Again, there isn’t a rule. It is up to you. You’d not spend a page describing a room that plays no interesting or important part in the story, would you? If you do it, you’ll make the readers believe it is more important than it actually is, or bore them out. During the first draft you can spend as much as you want pointing out details of the environment and the space but know that during revision, they could and will get cut out if they’re not relevant whatsoever.
  • The relationship between world-building and the settings: they’re directly related. If you’re creating a new world you’ll have to work through a lot of describing, and that has to do with—you guessed it—the environment. The space, time and temperature. All of these have to do with the world you’re creating if they’re different from what we normally see or if they’re not.
  • Let’s say it, describing things is oftentimes quite fun and a great way to practice vocabulary and your use of metaphors and similes to show and not tell in a powerful way. 

The following links provide great advice on both settings and world building and I recommend checking them out.

-Alex

Reblog if you want a Black Widow movie.

Reblogged from camiluna27

grokkengrumbles:

thevioletprincess:

image

"Do You?"

If I ever stop reblogging this, assume I’m watching the movie at that time.

Reblogged from abbiemillskicksass

beautifulsouthasianbrides:

Photos by:Bikramjit Bose

"A Bride’s Tale ;Editorial from Harper’s Bazaar Bride India"

(Source: )